If you've missed the ILI's Grow your Mind Webinar on Oct. 14th, about the Dublin Bay Biosphere, you can now watch it in the video above!

This webinar was presented by Biosphere coordinator Dean Eaton.

Information and queries not addressed during the webinar have since been circulated by the ILI. If you've missed these, please see below for links and answers: 

Websites with reference to water quality:

https://www.beaches.ie/

https://www.dublincity.ie/residential/environment/water-and-wastewater/water-pollution-control/beaches-and-bathing-water-quality

Comments about sediment measuring and damaged caused by the causeway:

"With regards to the causeway I have a feeling they were getting at numbers of visitors, rather than the road itself? As I stated biospheres are places to be shared by people and nature. The benefits of having people connect with and value these places offset the human impacts when used responsibly and its getting the public to use these areas responsibly is our challenge and we aim to achieve this through greater communication in the various forms mentioned in the presentation and via the new discovery centre when (if) built."

Construction of the causeway (as per NPWS publication):

The construction of the causeway to Bull Island in 1964-65 had a significant impact on current flows and sedimentation patterns in the intertidal area (McCorry & Ryle, 2009a,b). This led to the accretion of a sediment bank north of the causeway that was soon vegetated by Glasswort, creating Salicornia flats, and colonised by Common Cordgrass (Spartina anglica); although this plant had first been recorded at the site in 1934 (Doyle, 1934). The growth of extensive green algal mats also appeared to be facilitated by the causeway. There have been several surveys and assessments carried out to examine these issues over the years (see discussion in McCorry & Ryle, 2009a), and to examine the potential for re-opening the causeway. The most recent, an Environmental Impact Assessment (ESB International 2002) came to the conclusion that re-opening the causeway would have a minimal or no impact on sedimentation and that the ‘do-nothing approach’ was recommended.”

The presentation is also accessible via the link at the bottom of this page, for those who which to revisit it.

Don't forget to subscribe to ILI's YouTube channel to have access to these videos first hand!

Dublin Bay Biosphere Presentation
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